Steve Yegge is always awesome.

I recently came across this excerpt:

Desperate or not, those people aren’t going to work for me. I demand excellence from my co-workers. The disease, nay, the virus of programming-language religion has a simple cure: you just write a compiler. Or an interpreter. One for any language other than the one you know best. It’s as easy as that. After you write a compiler (which, to be sure, is a nontrivial task, but if there’s some valid program out there that you couldn’t ever write, then you’re not justified in calling yourself a programmer), the disease simply vanishes. In fact, for weeks afterwards, you can’t look at your code without seeing right through it, with exactly the same sensation you get when you stare long enough at a random-dot stereogram: you see your code unfold into a beautiful parse tree, with scopes winding like vines through its branches, the leaves flowering into assembly language or bytecode.

When you write a compiler, you lose your innocence. It’s fun to be a shaman, knowing that typing the right conjuration will invoke the gods of the machine and produce what you hope is the right computation. Writing a compiler slays the deities, after which you can no longer work true magic. But what you lose in excitement, you gain in power: power over languages and over language-related tools. You’ll be able to master new languages rapidly and fearlessly. You may lose your blind faith, but you gain insight into the hauntingly beautiful machinery of your programs. For many, it deepens their real faith. Regardless, it lets them sit at the table with their peers as equals.

From here

Our industry, the global programming community, is fashion-driven to a degree that would embarrass haute couture designers from New York to Paris. We’re slaves to fashion. Fashion dictates the programming languages people study in school, the languages employers hire for, the languages that get to be in books on shelves. A naive outsider might wonder if the quality of a language matters a little, just a teeny bit at least, but in the real world fashion trumps all.

Steve Yegge, Foreword to “The Joy of Clojure”