Interesting links: December 2018

Asperatus clouds

Interesting links: November 2018

Orbital sunrise (credit: ESA/NASA)

 

Happy Holidays!

Interesting links: October 2018

 

41586_2018_604_Fig5_ESM
Unattached Vortex above floating dandelion seeds (Copyright: Nature)

 

The doctor noticed that the student’s head seemed a little larger than normal and he referred him to Dr Lorber for further examination.

Dr Lorber examined the boy’s head by Cat-scan to discover that the student had virtually no brain …

In hydrocephalus the cerebrospinal fluid, which circulates through brain channels called ventricles builds up pressure that balloons up the ventricles pressing the overlying brain tissue against the cranium. This insult from within causes a loss of brain matter and many hydrocephalics suffer intellectual and physical impairment …

Hydrocephalus is usually fatal in the first months of childhood and, if an individual survives, he/she is usually seriously handicapped. However, the Sheffield student lived a normal life and graduated with an honours degree in mathematics.

Interesting links: September 2018

 

Ancient cities in northern Guatemala, discovered through jungle-penetrating LIDAR.

 

New movie trailers!

Decided to relax a bit tonight and catch up on trailers of upcoming movies, here are the ones I’m excited about:

General interesting links: August 2018

 

Five hundred meters across, with four-and-a-half thousand active panels.

 

Last month’s bunch of interesting links:

General interesting links: July 2018

Last month’s bunch of random stuff:

Though Predatorenjoys a warm reception from science fiction and horror fans, many don’t give it due credit for its tact and intelligence. What begins as an action film slowly morphs into one of the most effective and unsettling horror movies ever made. Predator meticulously picks apart genre expectations, destroying the ’80s action hero archetype and creating a villain that to this day outshines the film’s leading man.

Some of the more pessimistic commentators at the time of the credit crunch, myself included, said that the aftermath of the crash would dominate our economic and political lives for at least ten years. What I wasn’t expecting – what I don’t think anyone was expecting – was that ten years would go by quite so fast. At the start of 2008, Gordon Brown was prime minister of the United Kingdom, George W. Bush was president of the United States, and only politics wonks had ever heard of the junior senator from Illinois; Nicolas Sarkozy was president of France, Hu Jintao was general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, Ken Livingstone was mayor of London, MySpace was the biggest social network, and the central bank interest rate in the UK was 5.5 per cent.