Programming/Math/Science roundup: February 2018

Interesting stuff I came across last month:

p85-Oliver-1240x827
Oliver No. 1, 1896 
  • The giant shipworm (three foot long, lives on hydrogen sulfide, within a calcium carbonate tube that it secretes) has finally been located (by scientists, that is … local people in certain parts of Thailand have been eating it as a delicacy)
  • Say what you want about Stephen Wolfram, I’m beginning to love the long-form posts I read at his blog, such as this one on civilizational artifacts (enjoyable apart from the plug for Wolfram Language)
  • Apparently, plants are quite active at long time scales, and can be sedated, just like animals! (there’s a good GIF on that page, of pea tendrils, that I wasn’t able to embed here)

    When the dope wore off, the plants returned to life, as if something had hit pause — almost like they were regaining consciousness, something we typically don’t think they possess. It’s all so animal-like.

  • If you like typewriters …
  • An example of a new species (the mutant crawfish) emerging in just a couple of decades
  • Blast from the past: in 1995, an article about disruption in the supercomputer industry (never happened)
  • Continuing on the sea creatures theme for a bit: starfish have eyes. Below their arms. Scallops have eyes too, on their tentacles (with two retinas each) … I suppose the real puzzle being why?
  • Excellent summary of the importance of the role of “the log” in distributed systems and real-time data processing
  • Part-entertaining and part-insightful, an opinionated guide to Haskell for 2018
  • Oracle has finally made dtrace available for Linux. Personally this seems too little too late given that we have BPF now, but it’s still a good thing
  • Yes, there is a turing-complete Powerpoint
  • Couple of viewpoints on “unthinkable thoughts” using programming languages.
  • A certain unicode character became an iOS-crashing bug.
  • Finally, something for the very young with lots of time on their hands: learning Physics using Haskell!

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