“Jets” are the proverbial “Sufficiently Smart Compiler.” The seal between a core of Maxwellian purity and the world of filthy expedient compromises which lies outside must be absolutely perfect – like the seal on the airlock of a multi-generational starship. In fact, building the airlock at all is a terrible idea. Anyone who whines about being welded into the hull doesn’t belong on the journey.

Think of every high level language with a C FFI you’ve used. Having the FFI is not harmless. It colors the programmer’s thoughts. It destroys the Master-Of-All-I-Survey majesty of the entire system. Another way must be found.

In fact, if I had to write “hello, world” in Haskell to avert the death penalty, it would take at least a look at the tutorial. If Haskell supporters admit that Haskell has failed, apologize for inflicting on the world, and agree to at least consider defecting to Urbit, I will apologize for this ignorant attitude. Obviously, a lot of fine work has gone into Haskell. A lot of fine work has gone into a lot of things. It has not necessarily made them fine.

Neither programmers nor users are able to purchase a modern computer which behaves sanely – at any price. We have allowed what could have once become the most unbridled creative endeavor known to man short of pure mathematics to become a largely janitorial trade; what could have been the greatest amplification of human intellect in all of history – comparable only to the advent of written language – is now confined to imitating and trivially improving on the major technological breakthroughs of the 19th century – the telegraph, telephone, phonograph, and typewriter.

… a trivial (in retrospect) method for entirely relieving compilers of the burden of stack discipline: a necessary first step towards relieving programmers of the burden of compilers. A systems programmer or electrical engineer educated in the present Dark Age might ask why we ought to demand relief from CPUs which force machine code to “drive stick” in register allocation and stack discipline. After all, have we not correctly entrusted these tasks to optimizing compilers? Should we not continue even further in this direction?